USS Alnitah Advocator Header Image

November 6, 1945

BATAVIA QUIET AFTER 12 HOURS OF

STREET FIGHTING

JAVA:  Batavia was quiet again Monday after almost 12 hours of sporadic street fighting, but British military authorities reported large numbers of Indonesians were massing in Central Java and said the situation was tense throughout the island.  At least one native was shot and one British officer was wounded in the flare up Sunday night and early this morning in the in the northern section of Batavia near the Hotal Dee Indes.  The fighting started after Indonesians tossed two grenades inside the hotel enclosure, the British said.  British signal troops were fired at from a vehicle moving in the street.  The driver of the vehicle was shot.

GREYHOUND BUS STRIKE CONTINUES 

KANSAS CITY:  No break was sighted Monday in the wage dispute that has halter operations of Greyhound Bus Lines in 27 Eastern and Southwestern states.   Both union representatives and high company officials declared Monday they were ready to negotiate the dispute which sent Southwestern Greyhound employees out on strike Sunday night following a similar Eastern Walkout on Nov 1.

SUBJECT OF THE ATOMIC BOMB

BECOMES PERPLEXING

WASHINGTON:  The subject of the atom bomb has become so perplexing on Capitol Hill that lawmakers decided Monday they needed more schooling before they can legislate properly.  The Senate's Special Atom Committee will start night school classes Thursday to hear scientists unravel some of the mysteries of cracking the atom.

TRUMAN SAYS INDUSTRIAL STRIFE CANNOT BE ALLOWED TO SLOW DRIVE TO PRODUCTION

WASHINGTON:  President Truman told the National Labor Management Conference Monday that industrial strife cannot be allowed to slow the drive towards high production.  Appearing before 36 management and labor delegates at their opening session, Mr. Truman said a worried public expected them to find "a broad and permanent foundation for industrial peace and progress" without government control.

WHITE HOUSE DENIES FIGHTING BETWEEN CHINESE COMMUNISTS AND U.S. MARINES

WASHINGTON:  The White House said Monday "there have been no clashes between Chinese Communists and United States Marines"  Eben Ayers, assistant press officer told reporters.  He did not indicate what occasioned his comment.  There have been reports from Communist headquarters in China that American Marines had fired on Communist Chinese representatives at Chinwagtao.  Ayers said President Truman had received a message from Lt. Gen. Wedemeyer, Commanding General of US forces in the Chinese theatre informing the President there had been no clashes.     

SATURDAY TO BE MARINE CORPS DAY

IN NEW YORK 

ALBANY:  Saturday will be observed as Marine Corps day in New York state.  Govenor Dewey, proclaiming the observance, said the record of the U.S. Marine Corps was "nothing short of dazzling" and asked residents of the State to "make this a truly historic" celebration.

VILLAGE OF MRS. JONATHAN WAINWRIGHT

BECOMES HQRS. OF U.N.O. 

SKANEATELES, NEW YORK:  This village of 2,000 and home of Mrs. Jonathan M. Wainwright during the war seems to have become the headquarters of the United Nations Organization.  The village chamber of Commerce has adopted a resolution to make its headquarters here.  Chamber of Commerce President Charles T, Maher has notified Edward Stettinnis Jr., US representative to the international organization, of its action.

BABY WINS 100 TO 1 CHANCE TO LIVE 

CHICAGO:  Betty Ann Reyman, who weighted one pound and nine ounces at birth a year ago, won the 100 to one chance physicians gave her to survive.  After spending her first months in an incubator and fighting for her life with the aid of blood transfusions and penicillin, Betty Ann gained weight at above average weight and since then "she has not even had a cold," says her father, Ralph Reyman.

COL. SMITH MAY BE BURIED IN

ARLINGTON CEMETERY 

TUCSON:  The body of Col. Lowell H. Smith, 53, one of the Nation's pioneer aviators who commanded the Army's first round of the world airplane flight on its final leg, may be buried at Arlington, family friends said Monday.  Col. Smith died Sunday of injuries suffered in a fall from a horse.

Newspaper:  U.S.S. Alnitah, AK-127 (via Debbie Kane)

Updated: 03 Jan 2016    Top of Page    Previous Page    Print this Page

 
Copyright 1982-2006 Marine Bombing Squadron Six-Thirteen Association. All Rights Reserved.